The NYTimes just published an article on the, “financial and fatiguing perils of being a 20-something in the creative class.” It is a snapshot of the grueling and often bleak employment circumstances that millennials are currently facing.

‘The notion of the traditional entry-level job is disappearing,’ said Ross Perlin, 29, the author of “Intern Nation: How to Earn Nothing and Learn Little in the Brave New Economy.”

‘People are working much more and are convinced to invest themselves body and soul. It tries to make you lose your sense of your workplace versus home: who are your co-workers and who are your friends?’

Children of helicopter parents who have been overscheduled since nursery school might find it especially hard to set professional limits. As part of the generation ‘that’s been taught to engage in labors of love,’ Mr. Perlin said, ‘it’s led us into these fields, and secondly, it’s encouraged us to knock down that boundary between life and work in the traditional artist mode.’

At Live in the Grey, we actively champion the idea of blending your personal and professional passions and encourage you to blur the lines between work and play. It’s up to us, as people who live in the grey, to create the work culture that we wish to inhabit by our actions. Setting expectations goes both ways.

Take a look at the full article (and the comments) for an inside look at how this is affecting millennials, the creative class, and the workforce at large.

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