More and more office employees struggle with the overwhelming demands of a seemingly 24 hour work-cycle. Smartphones have enabled us to literally tether work communication to our bodies at all times. With this pressure comes the incredible desire to have more autonomy over our time. Autonomy creates motivation to do awesome things. The more control we have over our day, the more time we will spend doing things that matter. Think of Google’s 20 percent time program as a prime example. While it seems counterintuitive, a recent NY Times article says the best way to get more done may be to spend more time doing less. The key is to block out your time and leave room for restoration such as napping, exercise, and clearing your mind. Tony Schwartz, author and CEO of The Energy Project, says, “The importance of restoration is rooted in our physiology. Human beings aren’t designed to expend energy continuously. Rather, we’re meant to pulse between spending and recovering energy.”

He goes on to explain, “A new and growing body of multidisciplinary research shows that strategic renewal — including daytime workouts, short afternoon naps, longer sleep hours, more time away from the office and longer, more frequent vacations — boosts productivity, job performance and, of course, health.”

Read the full article to gain a deeper understanding on the importance of rest and get further insights on the power of renewal. How in-control do you feel over  your typical workday? Have you considered working one day a week from home or blocking out your time to rest?

[Image: Chris Crumley]

1 Comment

  • Alex

    I love that that the author proposes that you can get more done by doing less. I find that I am far less focused when I do not breaks during my work day. Even if I just get up and walk around for 5 minutes, it really clears my head!

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